Ameya
Jul 5, 2017

Migration, drugs and legalisation

8 comments

Edited: Jul 6, 2017

During my graduation, I along with my group undertook a research project on 'Impact of migration on drug use/abuse. This was our persistent belief that migration does play a significant role in falling prey to drug use/abuse and we wanted to test our hypothesis. The results were quite positive as per our hypothesis.

Actually, there are quite a factors which are complimentary to migration be it any sought of migration except 'step wise migration and gradual shifts'. The factors like increased independence, stress etc. especially in upward migration ( from city to town then to city etc. ) are conducive conditions for the development of habits like drug use and even abuse. It is quite affirm with the individuals migrations. The major drug markets which you will see in the world are mostly the famous tourist spots or the places where people usually migrate for job, education and settlement etc. Also, developing or underdeveloped populated cities are the major hubs of this as these also have a big market of migrant or tourist individuals and families. This is one of the major reason behind this.

Now, coming to the topic, legalizing drugs, in my opinion is a better step. Legalization of drugs will help in more regulations and transparency in this ever present unregulated industry. And the major customers of drug addictions (migrant/tourist population) will can be better advised or informed on this particular habit as all the drugs in their every type of dose are not harmful. There are some drugs which under specific advisory are also medically helpful, like in preventing stress etc.

Rachna Shah
Jul 15, 2017

This is a really interesting study that you and your group conducted! Which populations did you examine and over how long of a time period?

 

I personally also believe that increased regulation is necessary in the drug and pharmaceutical industries.

Ameya
Jul 15, 2017

The population for the study was students of domestic and international hostels of University of Delhi, as they all were migrant students.

Rachna Shah
Jul 15, 2017

How large was the age range of the population?

Ameya
Jul 15, 2017

As there were students from Undergraduate to PhD, so, the age range of the population was from 17 to 32. Our sample for a quantitative survey was 200 which was equally distributed based on age, gender, educational level and socio-economic status. Out of which 3 respondents representing distinct age, gender and socio-economic status, were taken for detailed case studies.

Cassidy Rodrigues
Jul 25, 2017

Ameya, thanks for all of you information! Your post is really interesting. I have to say that drugs being linked to migration doesn't surprise me however. If you look at this post you'll see that the statement Trump made about heroin coming through the southern border (through illegal immigrants) is true. This is one of the reasons I also believe we need to improve the vetting system as well as the security on the border, as most heroin in America is coming up through Mexico. I also believe that all drugs, opioids especially, should be treated as a public health issue rather than a criminal issue. I think Portugal is a great case study for this because they decriminalized drugs and then worked to re-integrate former drug addicts into society. Take this from someone with personal experience! I've lost friends and family to overdoses and the police do, for lack of a better work, jack shit to help out. This is a topic I'm especially passionate about because it hits so close to home so I'm up for a discussion if anyone wants to talk!

Ameya
Aug 1, 2017

Yeah! I am up for the talk. Just want to clarify that our analysis was about the habit of drug use/abuse in an individual due to migration of the individual (either short term or long term) rather than the trade and movement of drugs itself. And definitely, you made a good point about Portugal. I have read about the reformatory policies regarding drug there and they have worked also. But Portugal, despite having very low GDP per capita, is still a developed nation with very less population below poverty line. These kind of policies are very hard to process and implement in the poor and underdeveloped nations which are also the major markets and producing regions of drugs and therefore, some tailor made measures are needed for these kind of regions.

I disagree a little with you on the Trump statement because the reasons for the harmful and illicit drug trade is poverty and underdevelopment. Investing in security alone will not be a good enough a/c to me. As the underdevelopment in Mexico is harming America as well, therefore along with investing in security measures, there should be collaborative strategies regarding poverty eradication and development in Mexico and other respective areas by America.

Waiting to hear your thoughts!

Cassidy Rodrigues
Aug 2, 2017

Hi! I understand the point you are making about Portugal, and I want to clarify that I recognize that not all nations will work under the same policies due to differences in the makeup of people, overall culture and poverty, etc. however I truly do believe that the U.S. has the resources and power to do the same (or similar) as Portugal did, especially because most people in prison are incarcerated for drug charges and it hasn't helped the issue at all. I understand what you mean about poverty (I'm assuming you mean Mexico as one of these countries) however I'm talking about the U.S.'s current policies and what my ideas are rather than Mexico. I think that at this time intervening in Mexico's drug policies is premature and we should be focusing our efforts outside of the U.S. to areas like Saudi Arabia instead. Inside of the U.S., however, I believe it is totally rational to implement what Portugal has done. Many of the 'hot zones' of drug abuse, heroin in particular, is present in fairly wealthy communities, so I really see a lot of potential for this to work.

I understand what you mean, but I don't think that those two reasons are the only reasons why the drug trade is such a problem. There are plenty of dealers in the U.S. who come from wealthy backgrounds, but simply choose to sell drugs because it is lucrative, easy, and needs no formal education. However, I definitely think that the drug trade in Mexico is particularly to poverty, which is why I support their opportunity for legal immigration into the United States. That being said, illegal immigration is a huge issue and this is where most drugs are coming from. I am definitely not closed off to Mexico and the U.S. working together to help fix the drug problem, however I think the most effective thing for the U.S. at the moment is to improve the security as well as the vetting system so that we are only accepting legal immigrants.

Also, could you please clarify what you mean by "tailor made measures"? Thanks!

Ameya
Nov 3, 2017

Well that's for you and US govt. to decide, which is your immediate problem and which should be given preference, Is it Mexico or Saudi Arabia? Just don't make it a second Iraq or Afghanistan, as US is habitual and obsessed of doing it. But it will not do so, until it has a reliable alternative to oil. And as an outsider, I believe it shouldn't, as it will infuse more and more extremism in Islamic countries. The world is still facing the grunts of WMD (weapon of mass destruction) propaganda of 2001.

I agree with you on the second thing. The lucrativeness has attracted the wealthy to involve in this business. But I am more interested in cutting off the supply line and the cheap labor associated with it i.e. poor public (due to poverty and unemployment). Once this cost and more vigilantism is increased, it will be easier to crack down on the big cats. Surely, improve the security but don't overlook the collaborative measures between U.S. and Mexico as they can be catalytic in change.

Tailor made measures meant by the alterations and changes should be incorporated with the decriminalization of drugs in developing or less developed countries. welfare policies and highly subsidised schemes for rehabilitation, alternative employment generation etc.

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