Published Opinions

Submitted from Students Worldwide

July 30, 2016

For perhaps the longest time, everyone that I meet or talk to will either secretly think that China is Communist or will even ask me if I am Communist. Well, I think it's quite obvious. Of course I am!

I'm absolutely joking, but that is the type of thing that really annoys me. People will always assume things that aren't true or judge someone from things that they didn't do; stuff that other people of the same ethnicity did years ago.

One thing that I vividly remember is a time from when I was 9. From August of 2009 to December of 2009, my family lived in Hong Kong because of my dad's temporary job at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Since everyone in Hong Kong loves British people because they were a British colony, they have strong political and social views towards "mainland" Chinese. I just happened to become a target of those views. I attended Christian Alliance International School in Kowloon and I quickly became a target for bullies and other "proud" children in...

I have never been prouder to be a Democrat and an American.

That view is pretty controversial. Many people might not feel the same way, and this post is probably going to receive a fair amount of backlash (I'm ready for it!!). But what I heard these past four days represents a vision for America that is realistic, optimistic, and true to the ideals that our previous Founding Fathers have established. I say "previous" because, just as the Democratic Party expressed, we are all Founding Mothers and Fathers in our own right. Every American who contributes to their community and loves their country is a "Founding American" because America is always being reshaped, always progressing, always adapting to circumstances. Abraham Lincoln was a Founding Father. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony were Founding Mothers. Andrew Carnegie, William Jennings Bryan, Teddy Roosevelt, Terence Powderly, Dorothea Dix--they were all Founding Fathers and Mothers. So were Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King...

Israel has been part of my life for a very long time. Being raised in a sheltered bubble in the valley of Los Angeles, California, I have grown up in a fairly Jewish community. I have always heard from my family their love and great support for the state of Israel.

Last summer, my family and I traveled to Israel. It was one of the most eye-opening and life changing experiences. I was in awe and enamored by every part of Israel. I was so moved by the love and passion that Israelis had for their country. People from all over the world, from all different denominations of Judaism and other religions are able to come together in Israel. Israel protects the past and the future of the Jewish people and is the home of technology and innovation.

I realize that it is my responsibility to educate and inform others about the Jewish state. I cannot stand by and allow anti-Israel sentiments to occur. I am a high school advocate for Israel to learn how to combat these messages now, before I begin univ...

July 28, 2016

Recently, I watched New York senator, Adriano Espaillat's speech through C-SPAN in Philadelphia. Even though I am an international student and I don't understand Spanish, I was moved and inspired by his speech. As an illegal immigrant, he finally turned out to be a Congressman and then a Senator, proudly serving for the states. But lots of children of illegal immigrants, with legal citizenship, are not treated equally. I believe that the United States must do something to save them. 


For so many years, polarizations in the U.S. between parties split Congress apart and blocked the government from making long-term, effective actions towards domestic and international affairs. When President Obama attempted to change the current situation with immigration, Republicans quickly opposed the executive order and criticized Obama's abuse of power. Nowadays, nothing can be done in federal government level regarding the issue of immigrants. Since evidence has shown that nothing can...

Prominently known for its abundance of underground oil, the Amazon has long been a jewel to the oil companies and government. According to WWF Global, 19% of the Amazon has already been destroyed for oil exploitation purposes in the past 36 years, leaving only 81% intact. However, as these statistics show, the deforestation rates continue to decrease not only because of popular demand for fossil fuels, but also individual illegal logging triumphs; in July of 2012, 122.337 hectares of Amazonian land were destroyed by unauthorized logging, whereas only 34.902 destroyed hectares were authorized, thus illustrating an inconsistency with environmental policies and respect for the homes of the Amazon.


Contrary to popular belief, it’s not just the 400 or so Amazonian tribes whose lives depend on the preservation of this rainforest- it’s all of our lives. In fact, our future depends heavily on the conservation of the Amazon- that is, if we want to witness the existence of our planet 20 years fr...

The quadrennial presidential election is a great opportunity to educate young citizens about America’s electoral process, the government, and the responsibilities of citizenship. For many in-school children and teens, the results of this process is often greater understanding of the country and the constitution, or better critical thinking skills regarding politics. This year, however, the message received is different.


What made this year’s election stand out is the focused attention on colored people and immigrants of specific religions. An informal online survey shows that since the mid-season of the election, racial and ethnic tension in classrooms has been brought to an alarming level; bullying has also risen a dramatic amount. “Students are hearing more hate language than I have ever heard at our school before,” says a high school teacher in Helena, Montana.


Indeed, this year’s presidential election plays a great role in the unprecedented and worrisome changes among schools. The...

As an aspiring physician, I think a lot about curing people that are sick or in pain and being able to help those in need. However, I typically only think about these things in a first world situation. Since I have lived my whole life in the continental United States, I have become accustomed to health care always being there for me. However, on a recent trip to Cambodia, I visited a local village where I was shocked by the poverty people lived in. Of course, I have read history textbooks and been lectured to about the Khmer Rouge, and learned why the majority of the population lives in such conditions, but I felt very removed from situation until I actually visited. Seeing people buying food from local markets that were housed outside, on a dirt surface, in 100 degree conditions and without proper sanitation was horrifying to me. These villagers could barely afford to feed their families with incredibly unsanitary food- how on earth could they afford health care? I quickly reexamined...

July 27, 2016

2016 has been a monumental year in terms of spectacles and horrors. Scientists have landed a satellite on an orbiting comet, perceptions have shifted over women’s rights, and public ride sharing services like Uber have become household terms. At the same time, recent media has brought several atrocities to light, involving racial violence and shootings. What is it in the basis of human nature that can lead to both glorious and horrific situations in tandem? The role of authority in the form of policemen and civilians has become blurred, and many have begun to question the basis for the decisions made by these authority figures. This doubt changes the dynamic of the power figure in the local government and is playing a pivotal role in the irresolute landscape pertaining to human rights and the role of weapons.


In August 2014, the media focused around the events in Ferguson, Missouri. An African-American teenager was shot and killed by a police officer after a convenience store robbery a...

Dear my fellow young Americans,

I am frustrated. I am 16 years old and I am not old enough to vote, but there are a couple things I know for certain about America. I know that right now we are at an point of immense tension, and in my opinion, nobody seems to be responding appropriately. I look around today and I see America at a political and social standstill. I see this all around me and I realize that we are all frustrated.

As I studied US history this year, I was fascinated by the 1960s, when students like us took this yearning for change and made their voices heard in Washington and around the world to stand up for civil rights, women’s rights, and gay rights. They truly felt like they had no other choice but to make change, and so they did. They felt compelled to fight, and by fight, I mean with people power, not gun power. Fifty years ago, even though all odds were against them, young African American college students followed the lead of Martin Luther King and desegregated trans...

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