Published Opinions

Submitted from Students Worldwide

IMAGE VIA OHIO UNIVERSITY 

Every year around this time, the number of Google searches containing two words rapidly increases: cultural appropriation. It’s a topic that gets flung around intellectual groups and news stations, but whose parameters have inevitably fallen into the dust. Halloween comes, and with it arrives the barrage of headdresses, long silks, and other ethnic costuming promoted by the clothing industry. So, at what point does that little girl’s kimono become racist? She didn’t mean any harm by it, so how can she be accused of anything besides pure intentions? If we are trying to become a more evolved society of overlapping cultures, how does the celebration of one culture also attack its origins?

The answer, unwaveringly, lies in the approach, not the actions themselves. When choosing to integrate a piece of another culture into your dress or mannerisms, some will say you have to run through an evaluation of what that item or symbol may represent. Essentially, it’s the co...

IMAGE VIA REUTERS

Over the past few weeks, Bridge the Divide has turned its focus on religious divides that exist globally. In the BTD: Converge conference we ran a panel discussing different ways people are divided both between different religious groups and between religious and secular groups. As part of an ongoing attempt to increase interfaith dialogue and understanding a group of ambassadors have joined to share their thoughts and experiences regarding religion.

Christianity - Jeffrey Che, Maryland:

I believe that religion brings people together, but there is a cutoff point. Religion can help people develop morals, but when stark differences exist between people with different religious backgrounds and values, they clash and remain close minded.

Judaism - Jac Guerra, Connecticut:

My hometown, like many other southern New England areas, is mainly Catholic with a much higher concentration of Jewish representation than other areas. It wasn't until I started getting involved in media that...

TED EYTAN VIA NEWSWEEK

On Thursday, July 21st, 2016, Paypal co-founder and Silicon Valley entrepreneur Peter Thiel took to the stage of the Republican National Convention, delivering an emphatic speech aimed at praising the virtues of now-President Donald Trump. The uniqueness of Thiel’s presence came by means of the fact that he is an openly gay man, a rarity at the famously right-minded convention. Even more interesting was his endorsement of Trump, a point he justifies in depth throughout his speech, something that caused the liberal portions of the LGBT community to write him off as a traitor. However, the point in bringing forth this speech is not to contrast Thiel against the stereotypes of the gay community, but to reiterate a certain phrase that Thiel brings to the podium. When speaking about the efficiency of decision-making and Congressional progress, Thiel laments the fact that the “great debate” is currently the “who gets to use which bathroom,” to which Thiel asks “Who care...

Most people are familiar with Hasbro’s popular children’s toy, Mr. Potato Head. Whether you’re an avid Toy Story fan, or encountered upon product in your childhood, most can recall the various arms and legs, noses and mustaches, that created the appeal of a destructible toy. Other companies have similarly followed suit, with Mattel’s famous Barbie Doll equipped with thousands of various removable outfits to date, as well as Polly Pocket’s removable hairstyles and body parts arriving in 1983. These toys all have one thing in common; they call upon the innovative spirit of mankind that yearns to perfect not only his surroundings, but himself. It’s the same instinct that drove the homo erectus to migrate out of Africa into Southeast Asia 1.6 million years ago, as well as the reason that your next door neighbor just had plastic surgery to narrow the outline of her nose. It is evident in any pool of age, gender, race, background, or ethnicity; consciously or not, we are all striving to make...

At this point in the American election season, we’ve undoubtedly all seen it- blaring statistics lighting up the screen of the TV; patriotically hued posters in the periphery of our subway ride home; the peeling “I Voted Today” stickers on passing shirts in the wake of the preliminary rounds. The right to vote is quite possibly the foremost attribute to the American government system, something akin to the opening notes of the national anthem. And yet, time after time we are met with devastatingly low voter percentages following the presidential elections; according to the Bipartisan Policy Center, only 57.5% of Americans came out to vote in the 2012 election, down from 62.3% in 2008. While throughout its existence, the United States has only boasted on average a roughly 65% voter turnout, in today’s society it is mind-boggling to hear the seemingly indifferent attitudes of the American public. This is especially interesting when put into the perspective of how much more access to cand...

Please reload